seven | article | interviews | .

I, parasite
posted on 12-Mar-2000 by alan
the interview with nurv and J of i, parasite was conducted via email. the band once again moves into the spotlight with upcoming tour, new album ("horseslayer") and advances of dark vision media.
1. From the latest info on your site, your upcoming Horseslayer album is finished with the recording aspects. Can you tell us a what we can expect on the release? How many new tracks and who are some of the remixers?
J: There are five or so remixes from Turin, plus a good chunk of new material. What to expect? Well, we've learned how to get a crisper sound from our equipment, we have access to some fresher sounds, and musically we're covering a lot more ground with this release. Expect some experimentation with different styles.click to enlarge
 
N: There are 10 tracks on Horseslayer, half of which are remixes from Turin. The outside remixes are from Android Lust (Skeleton Key), Alien Faktor (No Question) and Cydonia (Criminail). We've remixed Flesh To Take and Vertebrae. There are 5 new tracks, one of which is a remix of the title track Horseslayer, which will be on our next full length album.
 
2. Why the title "Horseslayer?"
J: Cuss we like to kill horses.
 
3. What mixes were you pleased with the most?
click to enlarge N: Everything we've done since we purchased the Yamaha 01V digital mixer and the Access Virus B... That's a good number of the tracks.
 
J: Re-mixes? I'd say "Flesh to Taste;" we gave it a healthy dose of energy and Nurv's vocals are clearer and sharper. Shikhee's re-mix ("Skeleton Key") was so good we worked it into the live set. Those two are my favorites.
 
4. What themes are you dealing with on the new tracks?
J: I usually only become aware of themes and deeper meanings after some time has passed, and I can look back at the songs more objectively. I can tell already, though, that the new tracks tend to be a little less "in your face" and more psychologically involved.
 
click to enlarge
5. Who did the artwork on this one? How does it relate to title?
N: Paul Komoda has done an illustration that we will be using for this and our next release. The portions we are using here focus on a group of flayed, screaming horses.
 
6. When can we expect it to be released?
N: The official release date is May 9.
 
7. How has the response been on your first Dark Vision Media/Tinman release, the Ringworm Compilation?
N: It seems to be quite good. I am rather pleased that people are willing to open themselves to new virtually unknown acts. With any luck, we'll be able to do another...
 
8. You actually just recently collaborated on a project with tREBOR from Monstrum Sepsis, who did the artwork for the Ringworm compilation. Can you tell us a little more about the project and the purpose behind it?click to enlarge
N: Well treb0r and I are working on a bunch of stuff... I am going to be doing some vocals for their track that appeared on the Ringworm Compilation, MS is going to remix Skeleton Key, and treb0r and I are going to be working on a cover of an early Peter Gabriel song... That's it as far as music projects... but treb0r and I are working on a lot of Dark Vision Media projects too.
 
9. What is it like working with tREBOR? Any plans on when you might release any of this material?
N: treb0r and I are very compatible with our artistic visions.. I hope to release everything that we end up doing together.
 
10. You are also still collaborating on a project now called MAUTH with Shikhee from Android Lust. How did this project evolve?
N: Well, Mauth is the newly evolved form of Techfetish which was a project that had some baggage from a third member. So the two of us renamed it and changed the musical direction. We only have the very beginnings of two songs right now.. it's still very much in it's caterpillar stages.
 
11. How does this material differ from your base project I, Parasite?
N: It will be far less harsh than either AL or IP. More.. gothy I guess.
 
12. When can we expect to hear any of this material?
N: I wish I knew.
 
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13. You also appeared in Shikhee's latest video "Cherished Agony", what was it like working in this project?
N: It was a lot of fun. The location where we shot most of it was simply amazing. Pics of it can be seen all over the Android Lust website: www.androidlust.com. There's a really awesome picture of Paul Komoda covered in blood there too. I had a great time doing it. Made me really want to start work on an IP video...
 
14. Where can we see it?
http://www.freespeech.org/alexanderserpico/androidlust/
15. The latest news also says that you and Shikhee alike have got some tracks on the upcoming documentary film "Sex, Death, and Eyeliner." How did this come into effect?
N: Actually through a friend of J and I, Gabrielle Penebaz, who also has songs in the film. She mentioned the project to us and we submitted Turin. Piety was chosen. I forwarded the contact to Shikhee and they took two songs from her, I believe.
 
16. Are you in the film?
N: Nope. I know very little about it.
 
17. When can we expect to the film's release?
N: Check out www.sexdeathandeyeliner.com for that info. I have no idea.
 
18. Rumor has it you plan on doing a tour this year with Android Lust. What time frame are you looking at doing the tour? Are you mainly staying here on the East Coast for the tour?
J: More than just a rumor! We've wanted to tour for a long time and finally it looks like we'll get our chance. We're shooting for late May, and aiming at the Mid West and East Coast.
 
N: We're planning to split it into two phases... but since it's still in the works, I don't want to prematurely say something that may change... I will be setting up a tour section on our site, which will be www.darkvisionmedia.org/tour, when we have more details.
 
click to enlarge19. Your live set has went through several transitional sets over the past few years, what can we expect from your upcoming live shows? What will be different on stage versus past shows?
N: Nurv on drums! Well, until we can add a drummer to our live setup, I will be playing on our instrumentals. We're focusing more on the music these days, and less on theatrics..
 
J: Yes, the live set does keep evolving on us, just going over the pictures of the last couple years and it looks like a bunch of different bands. I can't really say for sure what the new show will be like, but I know that we want to energize it some more. We're getting into the possibilities of live percussion and bringing back some of that heavy bass guitar.
 
20. What bands have you been listening to lately? Have they helped inspire your work as a musician?
N: I have been listening to almost no "industrial" or "electro" lately, and have found it to be hundreds of times more inspiring then when I was. Bands finding their way into my CD changer have been Coil, Pink Floyd, David Bowie, Brian Eno, Das Ich, Bjork, JS Bach...
 
J: As I write this right now I am listening to "Shooglenifty," an Irish psychedelic-folk band that is really cool but doesn't influence me much. Cibo Matto and Moby, same thing, fun to listen to but not really inspiring. I like the new stuff from Beck and Death in Vegas, but when it comes to stuff that gets me feeling creative, I keep going back to what I've been listening to for years and years. Like Floyd or the Velvets.
 
21. Where do you feel industrial sound is heading, more noisy or more dancy?
N: Both. I think it's splitting. But the "more dancy" side also seems to be getting "more synth poppy" too, which I don't like... the "more noisy" side also seems to be getting "more repetitive" and less interesting to me. The stuff that I DO tend to like is the stuff in between those two ends.
 
J: Industrial as we've known it is already pretty dead, but it has splintered into many different areas. If you're into club music, mostly what you'll hear called "industrial" is really just harsh techno. The dj's like it because it pulls guys back on the floor after their girlfriends have been dancing to the gothier stuff (am I stereotyping here?). That whole "guitar industrial" or "coldwave" thing has pretty much retreated back into the area of stage rock, where it always belonged. The more experimental, noisier stuff isn't exactly gaining popularity, but I don't see how anyone could expect it to. That type of stuff appeals to a very small percentage of music listeners who aren't going to be swayed by the latest trends. You either get it or you don't.
 
22. Do you feel more people are becoming aware of the underground industrial scene these days?
J: Well, they're certainly aware of it, just not in the way I'd have liked. Rammstein and Marilyn Manson are not exactly the best representatives the industrial world could have hoped for. But it could be best that way, when you figure, would you rather have your favorite underground group break huge and suddenly find a million wanna-be's on MTV imitating them, with bikini chicks dancing in the background? It's all very similar to what happened to the Punk scene or the Indie scene years ago. As soon as a genre falls into the "pop vs. underground" paradox, it's time to move on.
 
N: So I guess people are aware of so-called "industrial" music, but not aware that there is an underground at all.
 
23. What do you think would help these musicians become more known? Do you feel clubs could do a better job promoting and booking? What about deejays?
N: Well, yes I do think that DJs and clubs could do more, but I don't think many of them want to. I get this impression from a lot of people that they don't really want any of the artists in this scene to have any amount of success. It seems that people are really obsessed with preserving "the scene". I think that this is also causing "the scene" to die a slow and painful death. Very often I feel as if I'm on a sinking ship, that this music is getting more and more generic, like any kid with a PC and a soundcard can dish out crap to slop onto MP3.com. A lot of the new bands I'm hearing sound more and more alike.. and it's getting really tired really quickly. Something has to happen, and soon, if we expect this music to go on in any form.
 
J: I can't speak for the rest of the country, because I've been stuck in NYC for the last few years, but I'll tell ya, the scene sure is hurting here. There are some good nights, though if you look around. "Malfunction" is a Monday regular that blends some fun '80's stuff with some weirder modern electro, while keeping a sort of local, grassroots attitude when it comes to booking bands. I know some people who put on a non-profit, monthly night called "Contempt," which has no guest list, which means no special treatment for big shots. People are encouraged to bring in their own CD's, which adds a lot of variety, and there is a computer screen that lists the songs in the set as they are played. These are all good ideas that I'd like to see in more places. Booking is tough in this town, as everybody knows, but that's just one more reason for us to get out on the road.
 
24. How is Dark Vision Media progressing? What projects are in the works now?
N: treb0r and I are (slowly) putting together a book of some of the amazing artists we know. That will be released under DVM Press. DVM may also be doing the multimedia for the next Android Lust album. Other things in the works are the ever present Screaming Black Circle, .the pseudomancer, Mauth, other multimedia stuff, web design, etc. etc. etc... I have more plans than resources, and I tend to get ahead of myself easily.
 
25. The Screaming Black Circle is a comic book collaboration under DVM. Can you tell us who is involved and what it entails.
N: Actually it is a children's book, not a comic book. We want to have it be like those old little Golden Books, with the heavy cardboard covers, and big, easy to read type. "We" are J and I (as I, Parasite), Paul Komoda and St.Michael (of Cthulhu Sex). Paul will be doing all of the artwork, St.Michael will be doing a narration over a soundtrack that IP will be assembling. A CD will come with the book, and you're supposed to read along. We're still debating whether or not there will be a "boop!" sound when you need to turn the page.
 
26. What is Splitend9? What inspired these works?
J: It started off as just some doodling, really, for St. Michael's Cthulhu Sex magazine. I still don't know how far I will take it, there's no plan, each chapter sort of writes itself. It's based on my own manic-depressive tendencies, like taking the love/hate duality of mania to its extreme.
 
27. What is .the pseudomancer? How does this relate to your music?
click to enlarge N: .the pseudomancer was a lot of things.. it was a powernoise project, an ambient dub project... an experimental web project... now I have no idea what it is... It may end up as a noise project again, but not straight powernoise, like it was. I might also mix that with the experimental web idea too... we'll see.
 
28. Are you working with any other musicians right now, other than the ones mentioned above? If so, what are they and when can we expect to see them?
N: When we start the next IP album, I hope that we can work with a number of different musicians. We'll see how this develops as we start to work on that release.
 
J: I'm in a couple other bands, rock bands, not affiliated with DVM. I play bass in a classic/ southern rock group, and I'm the singer for new NYC project that's sort of metal/ pop/ surf-punk.
 
29. Are you appearing on any upcoming compilations?
N: Not yet. I hope to get on a couple soon. I don't even know what comps are in the works right now. I've been so out of the loop.
 
30. What do you hope to accomplish this year, major goals to minor goals?
J: To really get our name out there, so people can hear what we've been writing. It's good stuff, deserves to be heard. I want touring/ playing out to be a much more standard thing for us, and I want to hit places that get missed by most bands. I'd like to expand our audience outside of the confines of the goth/ industrial club scene, work with other people who think outside of genres, try new techniques and instrumentation.
 
N: Major goals: pushing IP past its current musical boundaries, promoting the fuck out of IP, starting the second IP album, IP tour, Screaming Black Circle, art book, making DVM an actual company. Minor goals: Mauth, an IP video, getting some sleep.
 
31. The future of Dark Vision Media?
N: Well as I just mentioned, I'd like to make it an actual company... I don't think we're going to be a services company, like doing peoples web sites left and right.. I want to keep it a challenging art organization, but still do things on the side here and there for people. We'll see. I have many plans. Many more than are listed on the web site.
 
J: Too soon to tell just yet, but the pieces are all there. We have talented artists, musicians, and writers to work with, not to mention experienced business people. That we're not rushing it increases the likelihood that DVM will become a stable production company.
 
32. Anything to add, did I forget to ask you something?
J- Lemmie see.... Nope. That's good.

related links
official android lust home
dark vision media
monstrum sepsis website

 
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